New on Full Circle this week

Innovative Solar Decathlon house now on public exhibit in Phoenix
Arizona State University and University of New Mexico students joined forces to form one of 19 teams of college students from throughout the world selected to compete in the 2013 Solar Decathlon. The team produced a structure named SHADE, for Solar Homes Adapting for Desert Equilibrium, that won fifth place in the architecture category and sixth in the engineering category of the Solar Decathlon competition. Read more on Full Circle

Summer camps offer young students engineering and technology experiences
Students in grades 6-12 can learn to build robots, make iPhone apps and design thermally efficient houses through more than a dozen summer camps offered by the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering. These programs give students an understanding of the way science, engineering and technology shape our everyday lives and often spark interests that lead to deeper STEM engagement later in life. Read more on Full Circle

In the news

NSF funds nanotechnology ethics, education research (ASU News)
This fall, ASU undergrads can enroll in a new course designed to re-introduce the act of play as a problem-solving technique. The course is offered as part of the larger project, Cross-disciplinary Education in Social and Ethical Aspects of Nanotechnology, which received nearly $200,000 from the National Science Foundation.

Not yet 20 years old, Polytechnic campus is successful prototype for living laboratory (ASU News)
It’s hard to believe the Polytechnic campus is less than 20 years old. Several years after it opened its doors in 1996 to about a thousand students seeking a technical education, the campus began its meteoric rise to becoming a central player in boosting the economic, social and cultural vitality of the East Valley.

ASU students teach Kyrene pupils engineering (Ahwatukee Foothills News)
Students from Arizona State University’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering visited Kyrene Altadeña Middle School and assisted with a project promoting interest in the field of engineering. There were five different engineering-based learning experiences hosted by engineering students throughout the year.

Water-energy nexus: Assessing integrated systems (Nature Climate Change)
Mikhail Chester helped conduct a study that shows the missed opportunities from the lack of integrated water-energy management in the state of Arizona. Findings show that measures to reduce water use can indirectly reduce energy supply needs.

ASU undergraduates have the opportunity to enroll in a challenging course this fall, designed to re-introduce the act of play as a problem-solving technique. The course is offered as part of the larger project, Cross-disciplinary Education in Social and Ethical Aspects of Nanotechnology, which received nearly $200,000 from the National Science Foundation’s Nano Undergraduate Education program. Fifteen engineering students enrolled in the Grand Challenge Scholar Program participated in a Feb. 24 pilot workshop to test project strategies of the program.
Research network to study impacts of nanomaterials (Controlled Environments Magazine and an EPA News Release)
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has awarded a grant of $5 million over the next four years to support the LCnano Network as part of the Life Cycle of Nanomaterials project, which will focus on helping to ensure the safety of nanomaterials throughout their life cycles — from the manufacture to the use and disposal of the products that contain these engineered materials. Paul Westerhoff, associate dean of research for Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering and a professor in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, is the LCnano Network director. Read on Full Circle