NACE Competency: Global/intercultural fluency — Jessica’s Career Tip of the Week

Posted by on May 4, 2020 in Career, Opportunities |

Career readiness is such an important concept in the field of career development, and by applying the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) 8 core competencies, you will grow as a future professional, and increase your career readiness levels. Last week, I illustrated the concept of career management. At the present time, I am going to illustrate global/intercultural fluency. Next, I will define, highlight and provide examples of this competency.

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NACE competency: Career management — Jessica’s Career Tip of the Week

Posted by on Apr 27, 2020 in Career, Opportunities |

Career readiness is such an important concept in the field of career development, and by applying the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) seven core competencies, you will grow as a future professional, and increase your career readiness levels. Last week, I illustrated the concept of professionalism/work ethic. At the present time, I am going to illustrate an integral competency that will assist you with professional growth and opportunities career management. Next, I will define, highlight and provide examples of this competency.

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NACE competency: Professionalism/work ethic — Jessica’s Career Tip of the Week

Posted by on Apr 20, 2020 in Career, Opportunities |

Career readiness is such an important concept in the field of career development, and by applying the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) seven core competencies, you will grow as a future professional, and increase your career readiness levels. Last week, I illustrated the concept of leadership. At the present time, I am going to illustrate an integral competency that engineers will want to acquire – Professionalism/Work Ethic. Next, I will define, highlight, and provide examples of this competency.

 According to NACE (2020), professionalism/work ethic is the ability to “Demonstrate personal accountability and effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, and time workload management, and understand the impact of non-verbal communication on professional work image. The individual demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior, acts responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind, and is able to learn from his/her mistakes.”

Professionalism is about how you speak and your professional work image. I couldn’t tell you how many times I have observed individuals in the workplace that lacked professionalism skills. My advice to you is to observe great people who have excellent professionalism skills as well as a good work ethic. Professionalism/work ethic is about the way you speak, the way you communicate in emails, time management, and the way that you dress.

First impressions do count! An example that I will give is to make sure you can locate the company worksite before your interview. You wouldn’t want to go to the worksite and then find yourself running around the whole building because you didn’t take the time to locate your worksite beforehand. Imagine how your work image would be negatively impacted after that; especially if your future coworkers in the organization were to observe that. Another important thing that you can do is ask your coworkers if you can assist and collaborate with them on projects. This can be impressive to your boss in the workplace. One of my peer career coaches mentioned that this is how she received an offer right before she completed her internship.

You will want to immerse yourself into the work culture by always applying professionalism/work ethic into the workplace. Be helpful to your team, communicate in a positive way, and be accountable to your projects that you are working on for the organization. Also, act ethically and build trust with your team. As a supervisor, it is those who demonstrate having top-notch professionalism skills and a good work ethic that always get noticed.

Reference Cited: 

National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). (2020). Retrieved from https://www.naceweb.org/career-readiness/competencies/career-readiness-defined/

 

**Peer Career Coaches Richard Rigby and Lauren Monroe assisted with providing examples for the blog.

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NACE competency: Leadership — Jessica’s Career Tip of the Week

Posted by on Apr 13, 2020 in Career, Opportunities |

Career readiness is such an important concept in the field of career development, and by applying the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) seven core competencies, you will grow as a future professional, and increase your career readiness levels. Last week, I illustrated the concept of digital technology. At the present time, I am going to illustrate an integral competency that engineers will want to acquire Leadership. Next, I will define, highlight, and provide examples of this competency.

 According to NACE (2020), leadership is the ability to “Leverage the strengths of others to achieve common goals, and use interpersonal skills to coach and develop others. The individual is able to assess and manage his/her emotions and those of others; use empathetic skills to guide and motivate; and organize, prioritize and delegate work.”

Out of all of the NACE competencies that I have written about thus far, I believe that leadership is one of my most favorite topics to write about. In my own professional journey, leadership has been a work in progress for me. Prior to obtaining my PhD in counselor education and supervision at Virginia Tech, I was a career advisor (as a graduate assistant in my master’s program at Florida State University) and a professional career counselor for approximately nine years. However, after I graduated with my PhD, I found myself managing and leading teams at a few career centers. This is definitely a skill that I had to learn and acquire along the way. As I continue to learn more about myself and evolve as a leader, I always integrate Virginia Tech’s motto, “That I May Serve”. As I have reflected more on this motto and have learned more about myself in my leadership roles, I have identified myself as a “servant-leader”. I believe this type of leadership has been extremely vital in the work that I have done with managing professional career counselors as well as with now currently managing the peer career coaches here at Fulton’s Career Center. Due to my commitment to personal growth as a goal for each of the teams that I have led and managed, this leadership style is what I find works for me in terms of application. Not only is being a “servant-leader” about allowing my teams to grow and flourish, it is also about applying characteristics such as empathy, listening, and stewardship which are a few of my greatest strengths. While these characteristics are always important to apply as a “servant-leader”, I always strive to accomplish the team’s goals by having a vision and a strategic plan.

Now that I have illustrated examples of my own leadership, I will now provide examples of how my peer career coaches have served as leaders. One of my peer career coaches, who is a computer science major, stated that he is currently a member of an on-campus student organization in which he currently holds a leadership role. He has led meetings and conducted presentations to teach students new skills and information. Additionally, he has been an undergraduate teaching assistant and stated that he gained valuable leadership skills through assisting students with understanding concepts and conducting presentations so that the students are better prepared for upcoming exams. Another one of my peer career coaches, who is a computer systems engineering major, provided a good example of how leadership can be applied through teamwork. He mentioned that the leader of the team project needs to step up by holding the group together, providing hope, and brainstorming new ideas as the group establishes momentum in their academic project. He was also an undergraduate teaching assistant and was one of the organizers of a hackathon as well. He reported that the hackathon was a success with more than 400 participants.

Now that I have provided leadership examples, I would like for all of you to reflect on what type of leader that you would like to become. Researching different types of leadership styles would be a great start in this process. I believe engineering students are capable and very bright. While you are inventing the future and being innovative in the work that you do, think of the most effective leaders in your life. Ask yourself, “What made them great?” Also ask yourself, “What steps do I need to take to be a great leader in my future organization?” Remember that we are all a work in progress. As you are thinking about the topic of leadership, I’m now going to ask you to reflect on and internalize one of the greatest quotes from Mahatma Gandhi, “Be the change that you wish to see in the world.”

Reference Cited: 

National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). (2020). Retrieved from https://www.naceweb.org/career-readiness/competencies/career-readiness-defined/

**Peer Career Coaches Prashant Mokkapati and Arnav Kasturia assisted with providing examples for the blog.

 

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NACE competency: Digital Technology — Jessica’s Career Tip of the Week

Posted by on Apr 6, 2020 in Opportunities |

Career readiness is such an important concept in the field of career development, and by applying the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) 7 core competencies, you will grow as a future professional, and increase your career readiness levels. Last week, I illustrated the concept of teamwork/collaboration skills. At the present time, I am going to illustrate an integral competency that engineers utilize in their daily lives — Digital Technology. Next, I will define, highlight, and provide examples of this competency.

 According to NACE (2020), digital technology is the ability to “Leverage existing digital technologies ethically and efficiently to solve problems, complete tasks and accomplish goals. The individual demonstrates effective adaptability to new and emerging technologies.”

Engineers must continue to update and learn new languages as they progress in their professional careers. You may find that you are required to consistently update your knowledge and skillset as you embark on your career path. As programming languages become “outdated”, you will want to continue to learn and enhance your knowledge base.

Every engineer will have their own software or digital technology of choice that assists them to solve problems — whether in the classroom or employment setting. The best part of the modern world that we live in is the multitude of resources out there to guide you as well as the surplus of opportunities to learn new technologies. For example, one of my peer career coaches is studying mechanical engineering, and Matlab is taught here at ASU. She stated that Matlab has many capabilities, and there is an open source platform that can do everything Matlab can do and more. Currently, we have observed that more and more employers are looking for experience in Python, and less are looking for Matlab experience. Therefore, it may be in your best interest to learn Python. Python is also an open source and there are currently free online courses. Another one of my peer coaches, who is studying biomedical engineering stated that she also has to stay updated with different languages. An example that she provided was that in her freshman year curriculum, she learned C++. In several of her courses, she utilized Matlab. Also, in both her summer internships, she will have used Python since engineers are supposed to learn whatever language is relevant and needed for that project.

I will also provide an example of a software engineer who happens to be the father of one my peer career coaches. She mentioned that he works from home and the bookshelves in his office are stacked with books on the different programming languages. If a new project requires for him to learn a new language, then he enrolls in online courses and thoroughly studies them to be able to work on a project. He follows the same protocol when a new language comes out with a new version. Even as a seasoned engineer, he needs to continue to stay relevant in his field in order to be an effective engineer.

My advice to you is to pay close attention to what employers want and what their needs are in the job description. It may be in your best interest to navigate sample job descriptions now so that you have something to work towards while you are a student. Also, make sure to conduct information interviews with employers to assist with gathering information regarding what technology skills you will want to learn and acquire.

The examples provided continues to reinforce that engineers must be lifelong learners and continue to develop and change as we continue to evolve in our daily professional lives. At this time, I would like for you to think about how you can continue to update your technology skills, and also think about how these skills will allow you to solve problems more effectively in the work that you do.

Reference Cited: 

National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). (2020). Retrieved from https://www.naceweb.org/career-readiness/competencies/career-readiness-defined/

**Peer Career Coaches Kira Tijerino and Aarya Mecwan assisted with providing examples for the blog.

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