Seminar: Building the Grid of Tomorrow, May 24

Posted by on May 16, 2018 in Events, Faculty | 0 comments

Learn about the multiplicity required to design the energy grid of the future through three case studies. Andrea A. Mammoli, Director of the Center for Emerging Energy Technologies at the University of New Mexico, talks about the evolution of the grid and how the distribution feeder holds the key to these changes.

Seminar: Building the Grid of Tomorrow: A cross-disciplinary bottom-up approach
Thursday, May 24, 2018
10 a.m.
Santa Catalina Hall (SANCA) 151, Polytechnic campus [map]

Abstract

The 21st-century grid will evolve from pre-21st-century to one that relies primarily on a connected but decentralized architecture. The distribution feeder will change the game: from a system delivering energy to end users to becoming one that manages the local generation, consumption and storage.

Three case studies will be presented to illustrate the multiplicity of disciplines required to design such a grid.

  1. The modernization of the energy system for a small island could be optimized, through the deployment of PV and battery storage to augment the existing fossil-based generation.
  2. The development of an apparatus could provide short-term forecasting of solar irradiance but could have multiple applications like reducing the stress on a battery storage system or as an input to an optimizing power dispatch controller.
  3. The human dimension is considered, specifically in the development of models that can capture the response of end users to signals from a distribution energy management system.

About the speaker

Andrea Mammoli is a professor of mechanical engineering at the University of New Mexico and Director of the Center for Emerging Energy Technologies, an organization within the School of Engineering dedicated to research on the integration of distributed energy resources on the electricity grid through system architecture and controls. Mammoli has been active in the field of distributed energy systems since 2005, in the context of optimization and controls leading to better economics and enhanced resilience. These projects include solar-assisted HVAC in commercial buildings, building-scale energy storage, distribution-level PV and battery systems and microgrids.

Mammoli conducts research in collaboration with the Electric Power Research Institute, Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, among others. He obtained a doctorate in mechanical and materials engineering in 1995 from the University of Western Australia and was a Director’s Fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory between 1995 and 1997 in the Energy and Process Engineering group. He has authored over 100 peer-reviewed publications and was the recipient of numerous awards including the 2011 AEE Energy Educator of the Year.

The seminar is free and available via Adobe Connect.

Read More

Seminar: Energy Conversion and Storage in 2D Material Based Systems, May 22

Posted by on May 16, 2018 in Events, Faculty | 0 comments

With the exponential increase in energy consumption globally, one of the greatest challenges is finding improvements to sustainable and affordable energy networks that already exist. At this seminar, Amin Salehi-Khojin of the University of Illinois at Chicago will discuss breakthroughs in the field of energy conversion and storage systems.

Energy Conversion and Storage in 2D Material Based Systems
Tuesday, May 22, 2018

10 a.m.
Santa Catalina Hall (SANCA) 151, Polytechnic campus [map]

Abstract

World energy consumption is projected to more than double by 2050 and to more than triple by the end of the century. Incremental improvements in existing energy networks will not be adequate to supply this demand in a sustainable and affordable way.

In this talk, Salehi-Khojin will overview recent research on structure-property-processing correlations in two-dimensional materials that resulted in breakthroughs in energy conversion and storage systems. Specifically, he will discuss

  • Recently discovered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC)-based artificial leaf platform that operates solely and more efficiently on solar energy.
  • The first demonstration of a lithium-air battery system that operates in the presence of air components rather than pure oxygen and exhibits excellent stability tested up to 700 cycles.

About the speaker

Amin Salehi-Khojin is an associate professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He received his doctorate in mechanical engineering from Clemson University and completed four years of post-doctoral studies in the department of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2008-2012).

His research mainly focuses on the synthesis of advanced materials for applications in electrochemical systems including CO2 conversion and lithium-air batteries. He is a co-author of more than 70 journal publications and co-inventor of 10 patent application. His research has been featured in more than 2,000 news releases including Times of London, Guardian, Forbes and MIT Technology Review. He has been cited as one of 100 leading global thinkers in 2016 by Foreign Policy Magazine.

The seminar is free and available via Adobe Connect.

Read More

Sign up for SOS 498/594: Designing a Living Building this fall

Posted by on Apr 30, 2018 in Graduate Students, Students |

Discover and innovate the Living Building Challenge with students across disciplines in SOS 498/594!

The Living Building Challenge, currently the most demanding sustainable building certification framework, is comprised of seven performance areas, or Petals: Site, Water, Energy, Health, Materials, Equity and Beauty. A Living Building harvest its own energy and water, is built on a previously-developed site, has no toxic materials, recycles its own waste, promotes social equity and has elements that are purely for human enjoyment.

Read More