Welcome new additions to our community at the Fulton Schools Family Carnival and Car Show, October 13!

Posted by on Aug 14, 2017 in Events, Outreach |

Photo of eight people standing in a row with text: Volunteer at the Fulton Schools Family Carnival and Car Show

Join us in welcoming the newest additions to the Fulton Schools community, Friday, October 13, 2017 during ASU’s Family Weekend! We’re hosting events at both Tempe and Polytechnic campuses and we need your help to ensure they go off without a hitch.

Student volunteers are needed to help check in guests, set up, tear down and run hands-on activities for guests.

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Apply for the Lemelson-MIT Student Prize by September 29

Posted by on Aug 14, 2017 in Competitions, Opportunities |

Students work diligently in a classroom full of tools and equipment.

Calling all Fulton Schools inventors! The Lemelson-MIT Program, a nonprofit dedicated to celebrating invention and inspiring youth, is currently accepting applications for the 2018 Student Prize. The Lemelson-MIT Student Prize seeks to serve as a catalyst for burgeoning inventors across the country and honors promising collegiate inventors.

Interested in participating? Applications are due September 29, 2017.

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Be a part of the Order of the Engineer!

Posted by on Apr 3, 2017 in Opportunities |

This photo shows two female students with their hands through a large ring with overset text "Be a part of the Order of the Engineer"

Be part of the Order! Faculty, graduating seniors and alumni from ABET-accredited programs are invited to join the Order of the Engineer. The Order of the Engineer is a commitment to uphold the Oath in engineering practice. The Order consists of individuals seeking to uphold the integrity, honesty and values all engineers should possess to better society.

Order of the Engineer Ceremony — Tempe campus and online
Thursday, April 13, 2017
6–8 p.m.
Old Main (MAIN) Carson Ballroom, Tempe campus [map]

Order of the Engineer Ceremony — Polytechnic campus
Monday, April 17, 2017
6–7:30 p.m.
Student Union (UNION) Cooley Ballroom, Polytechnic campus [map]

Register for either ceremony for by Tuesday, April 11, 2017

This commitment to ethical engineering begins with the Ring ceremony. The ring is a symbol of the commitment of the Oath and is worn on the small finger of the working hand. Once a member is inducted, you will be a member of the Order without any annual fees or other meetings.

Registration is $15 for students and $30 for faculty and alumni.

Questions? Contact Jade Silva at orderoftheengineer@asu.edu.

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Engineering Smiles recognized by Tempe Sister Cities for humanitarian efforts

Posted by on Nov 1, 2016 in Students |

This content is more than a year old. Find upcoming events on the calendar or recent news on the home page.

Engineering Smiles project manager Sara Mantlik, center, poses for a photo with fellow mechanical engineering student Nick Kemme, biomedical engineering student Fionnuala McPeake, far right, IMAHelps cofounder Ines Allen, far left, and IMAHelps board member Jeff Crider, Oct. 6 at the Tempe Center for the Arts. Both Engineering Smiles and IMAHelps received Making a World of Difference awards from the Tempe Sister Cities. Photo courtesy of Sara Mantlik.

Engineering Smiles project manager Sara Mantlik, center, poses for a photo with fellow mechanical engineering student Nick Kemme, biomedical engineering student Fionnuala McPeake, far right, IMAHelps cofounder Ines Allen, far left, and IMAHelps board member Jeff Crider, Oct. 6 at the Tempe Center for the Arts. Both Engineering Smiles and IMAHelps received Making a World of Difference awards from the Tempe Sister Cities. Photo courtesy of Sara Mantlik.

Engineering Smiles received a Making a World of Difference Award from the Tempe Sister Cities at the Tempe Center for the Arts, October 6, 2016. Engineering Smiles, a student-run project that started in Engineering Projects in Community Service, has spent the last three years working to design, build and deliver a mobile dental clinic which will bring dental care to developing nations. They were recognized for their commitment to their cause.

The award “honors individuals who have made a substantial difference in people’s lives around the globe through their humanitarian efforts.”

“We were very honored and excited to be recognized during the Making a World of Difference event,” says Sara Mantlik, project manager and mechanical engineering student. “Not only was this the first time Tempe Sister Cities featured a student group, but it was an honor to be recognized alongside a variety of other amazing organizations and people!”

The team also includes mechanical engineering students Andrea Kemmerrer and Nick Kemme; biomedical engineering students Jackie Janssen and Fionnuala McPeake and architectural studies alumna Christine Bui.

Ines and Tracy Allen, the founders of IMAHelps, were also recipients of the award this year. Engineering Smiles has partnered with IMAHelps to support their medical and dental missions to Central and South America by transforming a trailer into a mobile dental clinic. Not only will the clinic expand dental mission capabilities, but it will reside at Universidad Católica de Nicaragua, where it will be used as a training aide for dentistry students when not in use by IMAHelps.

The award came to Engineering Smiles on the heels of the launch of their second phase of fundraising. Now that they’ve secured a trailer, they require funds to transform it into a mobile dental clinic.  

“As we enter the final fundraising push, the team is excited to finally see the clinic starting to come to fruition after almost four years of hard work,” says Mantlik. “It is amazing to look back at our first crowdfunding campaign as we were getting ready to start fundraising to purchase the trailer frame, and now we have fundraised almost 75 percent of our total goal!”

Though they’ve come a long way, with a graduation date of May 2017 for the students on the horizon, they’re anxious to complete the trailer and finish the project.

“It will sure be an amazing graduation present to ourselves though to see the clinic completed and ready to bring much needed dental care to those in need,” Mantlik adds.

For more information about Engineering Smiles, or to make a donation, visit them online.

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Girls’ Make-a-thon introduces young women to the world of engineering

Posted by on Oct 4, 2016 in Outreach |

This content is more than a year old. Find upcoming events on the calendar or recent news on the home page.

girlsmake-a-thon-2016-pz3408-a

Left, Sarai Utley, an aviation senior, speaks with a Girls’ Make-a-thon attendee about engineering, October 1, at the Polytechnic Campus.

Approximately 75 young women turned out to explore careers in engineering at the second annual Girls’ Make-a-thon at Arizona State University’s Polytechnic Campus on October 1, 2016.

Hosted and organized by the ASU Chapter of the Society of Women Engineers, the event provided girls from eighth to twelfth grade a look at the world of engineering.

“I had a lot of strong women mentors in engineering all my life, and I think it’s important for girls coming up now to have the same,” says Kat Screws, SWE’s outreach coordinator.

The event kicked off with a welcome from Barbara Brockett, Vice President of Engineering Test Services at Honeywell Aerospace. Following that, the attendees moved over to a “reverse career fair,” where they spoke with students and faculty from the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering as well as industry representatives to learn about the different pathways and opportunities open to them in engineering.

Pierina Ortiz, an informatics analyst at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, said the option to speak with girls appealed to her because she never had such an opportunity in high school. An alumna of ASU, she holds both a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering and a master’s degree in biomedical informatics.

“I found what I was good at and interested in through things like math camp,” Ortiz says. “But I wish I had someone available to tell me about the potential in engineering when I was their age,” she added.

Sarai Utley, an aviation senior who volunteered for the event, echoed this sentiment.

“I just want to be available for outreach like this,” said Utley, who is also the president of the Women in Aviation Club. “Something like 95 percent of commercial airline pilots are men — so this might be a career path that doesn’t even occur to some girls. I want them to know it’s an option, to think, ‘Yeah, I could do this.’”

There were also faculty in attendance from a number of engineering programs from each of the six Fulton Schools.

Haolin Zhu, a lecturer with the freshman engineering education team, spoke with the attendees about how she got into engineering, the challenges and opportunities within the different disciplines and her background in mechanical engineering.

“I really want to inspire future students and show them all the different aspects of engineering,” she noted.

Kayla Madore, a homeschooled tenth-grader, said her favorite part of the event was talking to the female students, faculty and industry representatives. Something she heard from Mariana Bertoni, associate professor of electrical engineering, particularly resonated with her.

“She said she’d much rather take someone who’s motivated and gets things done over a straight-A student. Grades are important, but it’s nice to hear they’re not everything — that even if you’re not the best student, there can still be a place for you in engineering.”

After learning about the different avenues and applications of engineering, the girls engaged in an engineering design challenge. The task laid before them was to devise a way to rescue a stuffed animal from a bucket and raise it a meter out of the bucket. Given straws, glue, rubber bands, paper plates, tape and other household items, the girls were broken up into teams and challenged to build an apparatus that could rescue the puppy. Many of the teams employed a scoop- or basket-like device to secure their charge, but others created claws and other inventive methods of rescue.

Maya Kostov, an eighth grader at Tempe Preparatory Academy, most enjoyed the engineering design challenge.

“I love to design and build things, so this really fun for me,” says Kostov, whose father is a computer engineer at Intel.

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