And the 2017-2018 SOAR Awards go to…

Posted by on May 21, 2018 in Customize your experience, Events, Faculty Awards, Organizations and Teams, Spirit and Traditions, Staff, Students |

 

In April 2018, Fulton Student Organizations hosted the annual Student Organization Awards and Recognition (SOAR) Ceremony to recognize the accomplishments of outstanding Fulton Student Organizations.

Kristina Halona, Antares Systems Engineering Lead at Orbital and former American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) Phoenix board member, served as the keynote speaker. Approximately 100 student organization leaders and supporters attended the event.

See who our 2017–2018 winners are and read about their accomplishments.

Read More

And the 2016-2017 SOAR Awards go to…

Posted by on May 15, 2017 in Customize your experience, Events, Faculty Awards, Organizations and Teams, Spirit and Traditions, Staff, Students |

This content is more than a year old. Find upcoming events on the calendar or recent news on the home page.

In April 2017, Fulton Student Organizations hosted the annual Student Organization Awards and Recognition (SOAR) Ceremony to recognize the accomplishments of outstanding Fulton Student Organizations.

Maria A. Reyes, Dean of Career and Technical Education at Chandler-Gilbert Community College, served as the keynote speaker. Approximately 100 student organization leaders and supported attended the event.

In case you were unable to attend, see who the big winners were from the ceremony and a gallery of the event! Keep up the great work, Fulton Student Organizations!

Fulton Student Organization Group Awards Funds Awarded to Organization
Advancing Women in Construction, Best Tour Safety Practices $300
Advancing Women in Construction, Outstanding Fulton Student Organization K-12 Program $400
Air Devils, Best PPE Commitment $300
AIGA, Best Demonstration of Community Embeddedness $400
American Society of Civil Engineers, Most Dedicated Alumni $300
AZ Hyperloop, Most Innovative and Entrepreneurial Fulton Student Organization $400
Daedalus, Most Dedicated Pursuit of Proper Safety Channels $300
Engineers Without Borders, Outstanding Fulton Student Organization $500
Fulton Student Veterans Organization  + American Concrete Institute, Outstanding Fulton Student Organization Community Builder $200 in funding for each organization
Material Advantage, Most Growth-Oriented Fulton Student Organization $400
Phi Sigma Rho, Outstanding Fulton Student Organization for Recruitment and Retention $400
PSYN 103 Community, Wowing the Inspector N/A
Rossum Rumblers, Best Safety Training Initative $300
Sigma Lambda Chi, Most Outstanding Fulton Student Organization Serving Graduate Students $400
Fulton Student Organization Individual Awards Funds Awarded to Organization
William Craig, SAE, Most Outstanding Leader for Recruitment and Retention $400
Nathan Fergard and Thomas Forrest, SoDa, Paul Hale Mentorship Award $400 each in funding (totaling $800)
Dr. Daniel McCarville, Outstanding Fulton Student Organization Advisor $500
Maria Jose “Joe” Quezada, Emerging Role Model $400
Bing Si, INFORMS, Outstanding Emerging Fulton Student Organization Leader $500
Read More

Fulton Schools news roundup

Posted by on Jun 30, 2015 in Announcements, Faculty Awards, Research |

This content is more than a year old. Find upcoming events on the calendar or recent news on the home page.

New on Full Circle

Kyle Squires

Kyle Squires

Kyle Squires appointed vice dean of Fulton Schools, will serve as interim dean
Paul Johnson, dean of the Ira A Fulton Schools of Engineering, has appointed Kyle Squires, director of the School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy (SEMTE), to the position of vice dean. The appointment takes effect June 22. Squires also will move into the role of interim dean July 1, as Johnson leaves ASU to head the Colorado School of Mines. This will be followed by a national search for the new dean of ASU’s Fulton Schools of Engineering.

Countering social influence and persuasion of extremist groups
Social media has become a vital channel for terrorist groups to share news and seduce new members. The recent, notable successes of ISIS in the United States and Europe have demonstrated that terror groups can successfully use this approach to further their agenda of violence. While it gets less attention, social media is equally important for groups that are sharing and communicating information to counter extremist discourse.

The problem is, how can those looking to counter the violent ideology of groups like ISIS analyze all the conversations to determine what is a significant danger? How can groups countering violent extremism leverage social media to limit the diffusion of extremist ideology?

Arizona State University will lead new research aimed at helping to solve this puzzle. The university has been selected to receive a highly competitive Minerva grant to gain a better understanding of what types of information “go viral” and under what circumstances.

Research findings point way to designing crack-resistant metals
Potential solutions to big problems continue to arise from research that is revealing how materials behave at the smallest scales.

The results of a new study to understand the interactions of various metal alloys at the nanometer and atomic scales are likely to aid advances in methods of preventing the failure of systems critical to public and industrial infrastructure.

Research led by Arizona State University materials science and engineering professor Karl Sieradzki is uncovering new knowledge about the causes of stress-corrosion cracking in alloys used in pipelines for transporting water, natural gas and fossil fuels — as well as for components used in nuclear power generating stations and the framework of aircraft.

NSF awards faculty $2 million to redesign undergraduate engineering and computer science education
Arizona State University is launching a project to revolutionize engineering education by creating a learning environment that values risk-taking, making, innovation and creativity among its students and faculty.

Faculty of the Polytechnic School, one of the six Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, will lead the project. The school, under the leadership of director Ann McKenna, has been selected to receive one of only six $2 million grants awarded recently by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Other universities and colleges chosen to lead this effort include Purdue University, Colorado State University, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, the University of San Diego and Oregon State University. The awards are part of NSF’s Revolutionizing Engineering Departments program known as RED.

Read More

Fulton Schools news roundup

Posted by on Mar 31, 2015 in Faculty, Faculty Awards, Fulton Schools, News, Research |

This content is more than a year old. Find upcoming events on the calendar or recent news on the home page.

New on Full Circle this week

What stops content from going viral on social media?
Paulo Shakarian was awarded a grant from the Young Investigator Research Program of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research to figure out what makes information go “viral” on social media – as well as what keeps it from happening.

Striving for stronger structural sustainability
A National Science Foundation CAREER Award will support ASU engineer Pingbo Tang’s effort to improve the maintenance, safety and resilience of civil infrastructure.

Making energy-saving strides in sustainable computing
ASU computer architecture expert Carole-Jean Wu is exploring how to make computing systems more energy efficient by using new heat-harvesting techniques.

Sustainability project aims at boosting water, electrical systems resiliency
ASU engineers are exploring how the Southwest can fortify its power and water infrastructure to deal with future climate challenges.

Outstanding education achievements earn Honsberg IEEE award
Professor Christiana Honsberg is a leading developer of new courses and degree programs designed to educate students on photovoltaics technology and renewable energy engineering and was recently was presented the Outstanding Faculty Award for 2014 by the Phoenix Section of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE).

 

Read More

Fulton Schools news roundup

Posted by on Mar 3, 2015 in Faculty Awards |

This content is more than a year old. Find upcoming events on the calendar or recent news on the home page.

Young engineering faculty rapidly building a track record of innovation and high performance
We are building a track record of high performance by young faculty members. This year already eight members of the faculty have been awarded NSF CAREER and AFOSR YIP Awards. “These highly-competitive and prestigious grants are awarded to young faculty with the best ideas in the U.S. Our young faculty are amazingly innovative and are already pushing the boundaries of their fields,” said Paul Johnson, dean of the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering. “In addition to being outstanding researchers, they are exceptional teachers, and their grant activities involve outreach to inspire the next generation of engineers.”

Read More

Fulton Schools news roundup

Posted by on Jan 5, 2015 in Faculty, Faculty Awards, Research |

This content is more than a year old. Find upcoming events on the calendar or recent news on the home page.

New on Full Circle

NIH grants reflect vibrant biomedical engineering research environment
Growing support from the National Institutes of Health shows research by ASU biomedical engineering faculty is tackling major medical challenges. Read the article.

Working to make mobile payment more secure
Gail-Joon Ahn has received five new patents and has eight more pending for technology that will make transactions more cyber-secure. Read the article.

Kozicki named National Academy of Inventors fellow
Arizona State University electrical engineering professor Michael Kozicki has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. Read the article.

Quest to unravel mysteries of our gene network
An ASU engineer is seeking deeper knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms that shape human genetics to help the pave way for advanced medical treatments. Read the article.

In the news

Schools use arts to generate passion for science (Arizona Republic)
Shawn Jordan is cited as one of the educators who are incorporating the arts into efforts to teach young students about engineering and science. The article looks at activities in some Phoenix-area elementary schools that are using the approach called STEAM education (science, technology, engineering, arts and math) to provide youngsters fun ways to learn to be problem solvers. Jordan is a professor in the Polytechnic School engineering program who also organizes and manages STEAM Machine Camps for Navajo junior high and high school students. Read the article.

Controversial Nicaraguan Canal raises concerns (Huffington Post Live)
G. Edward Gibson was one of three experts to join a live online discussion of news about a plan by a China-based company to build a $50-billion inter-oceanic canal in the Central American country of Nicaragua. Gibson is the director of the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, and a professor of construction management and engineering. The proposed mega-project is making headlines for questions it raises about potential environmental, economic and social impacts. Gibson comments on the engineering, construction and management challenges posed by the canal plan. Watch the video.

Physicist turned carbon-catcher (Symmetry)
Klaus Lackner’s work to develop carbon dioxide capture methods and materials to help counter the affects of climate change is featured on a science news website. Lackner is a professor in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment who directs ASU’s Center for Negative Carbon Emissions. The article looks at Lackner’s carbon-capturing “mechanical tree” and other innovative approaches for seeking solutions to climate-change challenges. Read the article.

 ‘Urban metabolism’ could beat ‘sustainability’ in a buzzword contest
(Next City)

One in a series of the Science of Cities commentaries on the Next City (“Inspiring Better Cities”) website explores how the description “urban metabolism” could be helpful in framing strategies and objectives for achieving more sustainable cities. Mikhail Chester, an assistant professor in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, is quoted on his perspective about the usefulness of adopting the evocative term. Thinking of a city as organism could foster an effective mindset for devising solutions to urban challenges, he says. Read the article.

Read More

Fulton Schools news roundup

Posted by on Dec 15, 2014 in Alumni, Competitions, Events, Faculty, Faculty Awards, Research, Students |

This content is more than a year old. Find upcoming events on the calendar or recent news on the home page.

New on Full Circle

Water resources engineering accomplishments earn international acclaim
Professor Larry Mays’ work in water systems engineering and management has had an impact in countries around the world. A global award recognizes his contributions. Read the article.

Exploring future of ‘postdigital’ textbook
A new research project led by computer scientist and assistant professor Erin Walker will look at ways to propel the evolution of the textbook as a tool for personalized learning and educational collaboration. Read the article.

Graphic Information Technology engages left, right sides of brain
Students in the GIT program on the Polytechnic campus are learning how to make things look good and work well. And they’re in great demand. Read the article.

ASU alumni build masterpiece for alma mater
Building a new home for your alma mater is the ultimate final exam. These alumni passed with honors. Read the article.

Expanding the tool kit for detecting, treating traumatic brain injury
An ASU biomedical engineer is developing nanobody probes to detect and treat brain injury at the molecular level. Read the article.

Innovation Showcase celebrates student innovation
Innovative Showcase at the Polytechnic campus highlighted the work of student teams that created innovative and imaginative solutions to meet a variety of challenges. Read the article.

In the news

Arizona FIRST LEGO League Championship Tournament
Almost 600 students ages 9 to 14 on more than 60 teams gathered with coaches and parents at ASU on Dec. 13 to compete in the Arizona FIRST LEGO League (AZ FLL) state tournament. ASU’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering manages the AZ FLL robotics program and hosts the annual championship competition that tests youngsters’ basic engineering, science, technology and teamwork skills. The event attracted coverage from local TV news shows. In addition, an article in the Yuma Sun featured the teams of Yuma students who participated in the tournament.

Hackers run wild as the Internet struggles to lock them out this holiday season (Phoenix New Times)
In a cover story, Gail-Joon Ahn talks about threats to cyber-security – specifically the growing trend of website hackers targeting electronic financial transastions between retailers and consumers during the busy holiday shopping season. Ahn is a professor of computer science in the School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering. Read the article.

Can a hundred-year-old chemicals business shake a toxic past? (The Guardian)
Rolf Halden comments on the complex challenges of protecting environmental sustainability posed by the use of synthetic materials and manufactured chemicals in industrial processes and products. New bio-based chemicals may provide a solution, but they are not a simple, sure-fire remedy. Halden is a professor in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, and director of the Center for Environmental Security in ASU’s Biodesign Institute. Read the article.

Mesa entrepreneurs create live-event app Crowd Mics (Arizona Republic, azcentral.com)
ASU engineering alumnus Tim Holladay and his brother Sean are getting attention for the startup they’ve formed after developing a smartphone app called Crowd Mics. The technology enables a smartphone or a tablet to become a microphone that can be used by groups in large meeting rooms and auditoriums. The app enables crowds to text comments and makes possible real-time polling of audience members. Tim Holladay graduated with a bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering in 2005, and says what he learned at ASU provided him knowledge he drew from to create the Crowd Mics app. Read the article.

Read More

Biomedical engineering advances earn awards for innovation

Posted by on Nov 25, 2014 in Faculty, Faculty Awards, Research |

This content is more than a year old. Find upcoming events on the calendar or recent news on the home page.

David Frakes has recently won international and statewide awards for engineering research and technology development he has led in recent years.

Frakes is an associate professor in the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering and the School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering.

Work he has done in his Image Processing Applications Lab at ASU won one of several Arizona Governor’s Celebration of Innovation Awards.  He received the Innovator of the Year Award in the Academia category. Read more.

The Arizona Technology Council in partnership with the Arizona Commerce Authority organizes the Celebration of Innovations Awards program.

His biomedical engineering projects also earned him a World Technology Award in the Health and Medicine category. Read more.

The Arizona award recognizes the achievement of Frakes’ lab team in developing a cloud-based computer simulation platform enabling precise modeling of the conditions of patients with brain aneurysms.

The technology aids physicians in developing patient-specific plans for endovascular treatments. It is expected to have a significant impact on the success of insertions of neurovascular stents to improve patients’ recovery.

The World Technology Award winners are chosen by peers in their fields, who select scientists, engineers and inventors they consider to be making advances that will have “the greatest likely long-term significance.”

Frakes’ selection for one of the awards was also based on the endovascular modeling techniques. A startup company has emerged from the advances in those techniques. Read about the company, Endovantage.

That modeling technology development is related to other biomedical projects that are bringing attention to Frakes’ lab team.

Among them is the 3-D Cardiac Print Lab at Phoenix Children’s Hospital heart., which is being run under Frakes’ guidance by ASU biomedical engineering doctoral student Justin Ryan.

The lab produces 3-D prints of individual patients’ cardiovascular, respiratory and skeletal structures. The lab also provides physicians a novel virtual screening of the conditions of pediatric patients, helping surgeons ensure the fit of artificial hearts implanted into the patients.

Read More

Fulton Schools news roundup

Posted by on Nov 18, 2014 in Faculty, Faculty Awards, Research |

This content is more than a year old. Find upcoming events on the calendar or recent news on the home page.

New on Full Circle

Fulbright award will take computer scientist to France for advanced research
As one of this year’s Fulbright Scholars, ASU computer science professor Arunabha Sen will have an opportunity work with some of Europe’s leading experts in his field. Read the article.

In the news

Sustainability: climate change warning  (“Horizon” KAET-Channel 8)
The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recently issued an updated report on global climate change that warned about the potential long-term affects of high emissions of greenhouse gases into atmosphere due in part to human activity. ASU engineer James Anderson was interviewed about the report on the public affairs television program “Horizon” on the PBS-affiliate station in Phoenix, KAET-Channel 8. Anderson is a research professor in mechanical and aerospace engineering in the School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy. His expertise includes climate change impacts. In the interview he stressed that the UN report showed it is critical to develop strategies to cope with those impacts. Watch video of the interview.

ASU professor is brain behind new imaging technology (The State Press)
Rosalind Sadleir is leading research aimed at developing ways to produce a more precise picture of brain activity at its most fundamental level. She’s exploring techniques that promise to provide deeper understanding about the brain’s inner workings and how various parts of the brain connect to one another. Sadleir is an assistant professor in the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering. Read the article. Read more about her research.

Read More

Fulton Schools news roundup

Posted by on Nov 10, 2014 in Faculty, Faculty Awards, Research, Students |

This content is more than a year old. Find upcoming events on the calendar or recent news on the home page.

New on Full Circle

U.S. Marine Corps prepared R. J. Mitchell well for being an engineer
Growing up in a family of military men, ASU engineering student R. J. Mitchell had one goal in mind: to be a warrior in service to his country. Read the article.

Veteran Evan Benson’s injuries threatened his college dreams
After a traumatic brain injury in Afghanistan, veteran Evan Benson wasn’t sure he could remember well enough to succeed in college. Read the article.

Homecoming 2014 Photo Gallery
Homecoming 2014 was a blast. And students, faculty and staff of the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering were a part of the festivities. See the photos.

Mapping flow of bio-electrical current to reveal brain’s inner workings
Combining expertise in neural engineering and bio-electricity, ASU engineer Rosalind Sadleir is trying to peer deeper into the fundamental processes of the brain. Read the article.

Building proteins to counteract cancer
Karmella Haynes is working on synthetic biology techniques aimed at reactivating one of the body’s natural defenses against cancer. Read the article.

ASU among 12 institutions teaming up to promote reflection in learning
A new Consortium to Promote Reflection in Engineering Education will develop and promote teaching practices that help undergraduate engineering students reflect on their experiences. Read the article.

ASU engineers have role in national effort to better protect water quality
A new research center will focus on developing advanced methods for dealing with contaminants in water systems. Read the article.

Renowned space and earth explorer joins ASU faculty
New ASU faculty member Scott Parazynski, an accomplished technology innovator, will engage students and develop research and programs to support human health in challenging environments. Read the article.

In the news

An entire platoon wearing wearable robots (CBS This Morning)
Thomas Sugar and Jason Kerestes have developed wearable robotic technology called “Airlegs.” The device is designed to enhance physical capabilities, particularly for soldiers in the field. The project is funded by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The technology also promises to provide greater mobility for people living with physical disabilities. Sugar is a professor in the engineering program at the Polytechnic School. Kerestes is a graduate student in the program. Watch video of the broadcast report.

Making chemistry green (The New York Times)
Researchers Rolf Halden and Robert Lawrence write about “chemicals of emerging concern” in a commentary on the difficulty of spurring timely action on the regulation of chemicals and chemical compounds that are being shown to pose threats to human and environmental health. It has taken decades to initiate efforts to curb the use of some of the manufactured chemical compounds that are potentially the most dangerous. The authors make a case for promoting the use of “green” chemicals. Halden is a professor in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, and director of the Center for Environmental Security at ASU. Lawrence is director of the Center for a Livable Future at John Hopkins University. Read the article.

Making and innovation find a new home in the Valley (KJZZ/NPR)
Micah Lande says invention and innovation are becoming more of a communal endeavor with the emergence of what’s called the Maker Movement. He was interviewed about his perspective on the maker trend on the Arizona affiliate station of National Public Radio. Lande is an assistant professor of engineering in the Polytechnic School. Read a transcript of the broadcast.

ASU professor improves imaging technology, improves cancer treatment (The State Press)
Vikram Kodibagkar is leading research to make advances in medical imaging – specifically magnetic resonance imaging techniques – that promise to aid the battle against cancer. Kodibagkar is an assistant professor in the School of Biological and Health System Engineering. Read the article.

Phoenix adding low-skill jobs at risk of automation (The Arizona Republic)
G. Edward Gibson Jr. is quoted throughout a news article on the potential impact of advances in automation technology on the job market, particularly in the construction industry. Gibson is a professor and director of the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment. Read the article.

Read More