Order of the Engineer at the Polytechnic campus April 29

Posted by on Apr 20, 2015 in Spirit and Traditions | 0 comments

Graduating seniors, be part of a Fulton Engineering tradition!  Join us for the spring 2015 Order of the Engineer ceremony at the Polytechnic campus.

All spring 2015 graduating seniors and alumni of ABET-accredited programs as well as professional engineers, licensed in the U.S., are invited to participate.

Order of the Engineer is a commitment to uphold the oath in engineering practice.  The Order embodies upholding engineering integrity, honesty and values to better society.  The Ring Ceremony is a symbol of this commitment.

Wednesday, April 29, 2015
4:30-5:45
p.m.
Century Hall, Multipurpose Room, Poly campus
Registration is $15 for students and $30 for professionals, registration includes the ceremonial ring.

Questions? Contact Jade Silva, coordinator of Undergraduate Student Engagement, at orderoftheengineer@asu.edu.

 

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Jobs and Internships – week of May 4

Posted by on May 1, 2015 in Career, Opportunities, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Did you know you can use Sun Devil CareerLink (SDCL) to search degree-related job opportunities and internships, upload your résumés for recruiting employers to view, schedule on-campus interviews and see who’s recruiting at engineering career events throughout the year? If you’re not taking advantage of this resource, register for SDCL today. Want to learn more? Check out this SDCL Quick Reference GuideThis week there are 446 postings related to Fulton Schools degree programs in SDCL.

Follow the “Read more” link for just a few examples of what you can find in Sun Devil CareerLink this week.

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Sign up to become a biomedical engineering mentor

Posted by on May 1, 2015 in Organizations and Teams | 0 comments

Interested in helping out incoming freshmen in biomedical engineering? If so, the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES) at ASU invites you to apply to their mentorship program.

This application is only open to students in biomedical engineering. The deadline is Friday June 5, 2015. Sign up today if you are interested!

Questions?

Please contact either the Mentorship Coordinator, Scott Boege, at sboege1@asu.edu or the BMES President, Catherine Millar-Haskell, at cmillarh@asu.edu.

 

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First place win in the Jeopardy competition at the AIChE regional conference

Posted by on Apr 29, 2015 in Organizations and Teams | 0 comments

The chemical engineering team of Zachary Gordon, Daniel Herschel, Vincent Kaufmann, Andrew Roberts, and Zixuan Wang won first place in the annual Chem-E Jeopardy tournament held at the Rocky Mountain Regional AIChE conference.  Chemical engineering Jeopardy is a tradition at every AIChE conference.  First place winners of each regional conference will move on to compete against eight first place winners at the national conference next year in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The trip to the AIChE Rocky Mountain Student Regional Conference was sponsored by the AIChE ASU Chapter, School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, and the Dean’s Office. The team thanks their faculty advisor, assistant professor David Nielsen, and looks forward to a win at the national conference.

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Chemical engineering major awarded prestigious Goldwater Scholarship

Posted by on Apr 28, 2015 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Arizona State University engineering undergraduate Morgan Kelley (right) is doing research under the guidance of chemical engineering professor Lenore Dai (left). Kelley's research experience has helped her win a Goldwater Scholarship to support her in completing work for bachelor's degree. Photographer: Jessica Hochreiter/ASU

Arizona State University engineering undergraduate Morgan Kelley (right) is doing research under the guidance of chemical engineering professor Lenore Dai (left). Kelley’s research experience has helped her win a Goldwater Scholarship to support her in completing work for bachelor’s degree. Photographer: Jessica Hochreiter/ASU

 

Chemical engineering student Morgan Kelley is among the academic high-achievers throughout the country to recently be awarded a Goldwater Scholarship — considered the premier undergraduate scholarship for mathematics, science and engineering majors. From more than 1,200 nominees she is one of 260 students — and one of 68 engineering majors — selected to receive the award that provides up to $7,500 per year to support completion of undergraduate studies.

The Goldwater Scholarship Program, honoring the late U.S. Sen. Barry Goldwater of Arizona, is intended to encourage outstanding students to pursue graduate studies and careers in engineering, science and mathematics fields.

Kelley, who grew up in Glendale, said she more or less decided in the sixth grade to become a chemical engineer, when her mother “just told me that is what I should be, though I don’t think she had much of an idea of what chemical engineers do.”

Finding purpose

She graduated from Xavier College Preparatory high school in Phoenix three years ago and was accepted into ASU’s Barrett, The Honors College, enrolling in the chemical engineering program in the School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, one of ASU’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering. “But when I came here, I didn’t want to go to graduate school,” she recalled. “I just wanted to get through school and get a job right away. But then I fell in love with research.”

The opportunity to work in the lab with graduate students and be mentored by professors about how to do research has broadened her perspective on what she might be capable of achieving.

“With a four-year degree I could get a good job, but with a graduate degree and research experience I feel I could get to do something that gives me a more meaningful purpose, that I might be a part of a some really important discovery or breakthrough someday,” she said.

Taking on challenges

Now finishing her junior year, she is set on earning a doctoral degree. Getting a Goldwater Scholarship should help open doors to that pursuit. The award has traditionally served as a stepping-stone into top fellowship programs that support graduate students.

Kelley is in the Grand Challenge Scholars program, which maps out courses of study that train students to take on what the National Academy of Engineering deems the biggest challenges for engineering in the 21st century.

She’s preparing for that role by performing well in more than class assignments and tests.

Through the Fulton Undergraduate Research Initiative (FURI) she is delving deep into research aimed at engineering more effective ways to keep oceans and other water environments cleaner and healthier.

Her FURI research project was the basis for the research proposal that helped Kelley win the Goldwater Scholarship.

Branching out

Through the Engineering Projects in Community Service (EPICS) program in the Fulton Schools of Engineering, she has led or been co-leader on student projects to develop and deliver portable technologies to provide nighttime lighting to students in Fiji and Uganda, places where electrical power is limited and unreliable. She is also is serving as a teaching assistant to help fellow students develop their EPICS projects.

She has won awards in student science and engineering competitions, including a semi-finalist award in the national Dell Social Innovation Challenge.

In 2014 Kelley completed an internship in research and development job for the Henkel Corporation, a major consumer goods manufacturing company.

She has been serving as a Fulton Ambassador, giving campus tours to prospective ASU engineering students and visiting local high schools to tell young students about college engineering studies and careers.

She’s been a peer mentor to fellow students and a counselor at E2, the Fulton Schools of Engineering freshman experience.

Opportunities to grow

“Morgan is an outstanding student in all aspects of her studies and efforts outside the classroom,” said professor Lenore Dai, chair of the chemical engineering program and Kelley’s research mentor. “She is especially talented in research.  She is a co-author of a paper published in prominent research journal. As a junior she presented her research at an annual meeting of the American Chemical Society. These are unusual accomplishments for an undergraduate.”

Winning a Goldwater Scholarship “is recognition of Morgan’s exemplary accomplishments in the classroom, in the lab and in community service,” said Kyle Squires, director of the School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy. “It’s really gratifying to see students like Morgan capitalize on all the opportunities we are working to provide our students to help them grow as scholars, researchers and leaders in the community.”

Gaining confidence

Kelley plans to graduate with her bachelor’s degree next spring, and begin graduate school soon after.

That will mark a new stage of higher education for her that only a few years ago she wasn’t expecting to reach.

“When I began college I didn’t think I was one of the really smart people and wasn’t sure how I would do,” Kelley said. “But I found myself at ASU. I came to understand the style of learning that works for me, and I’ve gained confidence.”

Scott Shrake, director of the EPICS program, foresees Kelley continuing to expand on her achievements.

“Morgan is without a doubt academically gifted, but her strengths go well beyond that,” Shrake said. “She’s incredibly well rounded, with an affable personality, a big heart, and the desire, drive and skill set to have a huge impact.  She’s going to be one of those people who makes a dent in the world, and I can’t wait to see it.”

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Law school anyone?

Posted by on Apr 28, 2015 in Opportunities | 0 comments

ASU’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law can now admit a limited number of 2015 ASU graduates who have not taken the Law School Admissions Test and meet the following academic requirements:

  • Currently enrolled in an ASU undergraduate program.
  • Graduating from ASU prior to August.
  • Have earned GPA of 3.7 or above at the end of six semesters of work.
  • Scored at or above the 85th percentile on the ACT or SAT.

Think a legal education at a top-10 public law school is for you? Contact ASU Law Dean Douglas Sylvester for more information.

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Fulton Schools news roundup

Posted by on Apr 27, 2015 in Research | 0 comments

New on Full Circle this week

ASU lab provides invaluable insight into the user experience
A newly opened lab in the Fulton Schools can provide the evidence-based data and analysis that will provide invaluable insights into the user experience.

Seeking the next steps forward in shape-recovery metal alloys
An NSF CAREER Award helps a mechanical engineering assistant professor Jagannathan Rajagopalan expand work on transforming ordinary metals into smart materials.

In the news

Klaus Lackner is pulling CO2 out of thin air
Director of the Center for Negative Carbon Emissions, Klaus Lackner, is developing technology that shows promise for helping to reduce the troublesome buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

Developing alternative concrete materials to protect the environment
Narayanan Neithalath, associate professor in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, is formulating new kinds of concrete that could be made without the harmful greenhouse gases emitted in the production of conventional concrete.

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ASU information security resources

Posted by on Apr 27, 2015 in Resources | 0 comments

Take action today to make sure your computer, smart phone and identity are protected. ASU’s Information Security Offices offers services and information.

Identity Theft:  ASU will help protect you
ASU takes your security and that of your personal information seriously. ASU has partnered with AllClear ID to provide you with complimentary identity repair assistance.

Ransomware:  The new threat
An evolving security threat, known as Ransomware, infects computers through malware and requires payment before files are released. Tips for what to do if you fall victim to ransomware and tips to protect you against ransomware and other malware are offered.

Cybercrime on campus: Six tips to stay safe
Six tips on what to do to protect yourself and what to do if you are already a victim.

Going mobile: Be secure
We are in the mobile technology age. Mobile devices, like smartphones and tablets, are basically small portable computers and subject to the same vulnerabilities.  Find basic tips on securing your mobile devices.

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GlobalResolve constructs aquaponics farm for Peruvian orphanage

Posted by on Apr 27, 2015 in Organizations and Teams, Students | 0 comments

GlobalResolve students celebrate the completion of a new aquaponics system alongside children and caretakers from the Azul Wasi orphanage in Oropesa, Peru.

GlobalResolve students celebrate the completion of a new aquaponics system alongside children and caretakers from the Azul Wasi orphanage in Oropesa, Peru. Photo courtesy of GlobalResolve

From designing greenhouses to inspiring future engineers, members of GlobalResolve have completed a series of projects aimed at improving quality of life at the Azul Wasi orphanage in Oropesa, Peru.

In March, 10 students traveled to Peru during ASU’s spring break to construct an aquaponics farm for Azul Wasi, while simultaneously offering STEM-learning opportunities for the 22 male children housed there.

The ASU students were accompanied by Gerald Polesky, a lecturer in the Polytechnic School, who has worked on various engineering projects at the orphanage since his daughter, ASU alumna, Tiffany Brown founded it in 2006.

The completed aquaponics system

The completed aquaponics system. Photo courtesy of GlobalResolve

Aquaponics is a system for farming fish and plants together in a mutually beneficial cycle—fish produce waste, which fertilizes plants and the plants in-turn purify the water for the fish. The aquaponics farm will provide food sources such as potatoes, tomatoes and fish to be used and sold, providing a reliable source of income for the orphanage.

“We succeeded in building an entire aquaponics system in just four days,” said GlobalResolve president Andres Fuentes, a junior studying engineering.

In addition to improving the orphanage’s living conditions, funds from the aquaponics farm will allow for additional orphans to be housed.

Promoting a STEM future

During their visit, the GlobalResolve students interacted with the orphans through STEM outreach activities, including an egg drop activity that illustrated interesting science and mathematics concepts.

“We encouraged the children to embrace mathematics, science, technology and engineering, and gave them tips on how to improve their future by pursuing an education and believing in themselves,” said Fuentes.

“All of the boys [at Azul Wasi] are among the top students in their classes with five of them already attending university,” said Polesky. One student has made his way to the U.S. to pursue engineering at Belleview College in Washington.

In 2014, a group of GlobalResolve students built a greenhouse for the Azul Wasi orphanage that continues to be beneficial and successful. Other past projects include implementing a Biochar system and renovating a dining facility.

“The chance to change the lives of these Peruvian orphans alongside a team of my fellow engineering students has been the most rewarding and fulfilling experience of my life,” said Fuentes.

Make a difference with GlobalResolve

In the summer of 2016 the GlobalResolve club plans to design and build a wind turbine to help the orphanage meet their power needs.

Next year’s project is open to new club members, so Fuentes encourages anyone who is “passionate about helping others” to join GlobalResolve and help make the Peru 2016 trip a success.

Learn more about GlobalResolve and their projects across the world.

Students who participated in the aquaponics construction project:

Andres Fuentes, junior, engineering
Ting Au, senior, engineering
Andres Vallejo, junior, manufacturing engineering
Damian Gudino, junior, engineering
Mario Diaz, senior, aerospace engineering
Alex Smith, senior, aerospace engineering
Chris Burnett, sophomore, engineering
Luiz Tiscareno, senior, accounting
Cameron Hines, senior, aerospace engineering
Jennifer Adam, senior, Six Sigma Green Belt Program

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It’s time to think about updating your resume – Joyce’s Career Tip of the Week

Posted by on Apr 27, 2015 in Career | 0 comments

It’s the last week of classes for the spring 2015 semester!

That means it’s the time of the year when Fulton Schools students are feverishly working to complete projects, assignments, finish papers and prepare for final exams.

It’s also a good time of the year to think about how you want to update your resume.

Many students have an “Academic Projects” section on their resume. As you are studying, jot down a few notes about the new skills you used in your most recent projects. Students who have been involved in semester-long research should do the same thing.

Student leaders, as you are transitioning and passing information to your successors, write those notes to yourself as well. Reflect on the challenges you faced, the problems you solved; recognize your accomplishments and note those of which you are most proud.

Once finals are behind you, take the time to put your notes into bullets: Start with a strong action word, briefly describe the problem and show the results.

If you already have an internship for the summer, there is no need to update your resume right now. You will also be adding this summer’s internship experience when you are getting your resume ready for the fall recruiting season.

If you are still looking for a job after graduation this May or an internship for this summer, be sure to attend our Job/Internship Search All-day Super Session on Monday, May 18. 

 

Joyce Donahue is a Career Counselor in the Fulton Schools Career Center.  She is a nationally certified career counselor and holds “Master Career Counselor” membership status in the National Career Development Association.

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Attend A. Wade Smith Memorial Lecture on race relations on college campuses, April 29

Posted by on Apr 24, 2015 in Events | 0 comments

Walter R. Allen, distinguished professor of education and sociology at UCLA, will discuss the policing of black men on college campuses at the 20th annual A. Wade Smith Memorial Lecture on Race Relations. He chose this topic because of national news like Ferguson, Missouri, even though that incident didn’t happen on a college campus. “While we celebrate progress that’s been made, we recognize there is still a long journey ahead to the place where we don’t have these types of problems in American society,” said Allen.

Black Lives Matter: Hyper-Surveillance and Policing of Black Males on U.S. Campuses
Wednesday, April 29, 2015
7 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m.)
Memorial Union, Arizona Ballroom, Tempe campus [map]

The A. Wade Smith Memorial Lecture on Race Relations was created in 1995 in honor of ASU professor and chair of sociology A. Wade Smith and promotes racial parity. Learn more about this year’s event

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Jobs and Internships – week of April 27

Posted by on Apr 24, 2015 in Career, Opportunities | 0 comments

Did you know you can use Sun Devil CareerLink (SDCL) to search degree-related job opportunities and internships, upload your résumés for recruiting employers to view, schedule on-campus interviews and see who’s recruiting at engineering career events throughout the year? If you’re not taking advantage of this resource, register for SDCL today. Want to learn more? Check out this SDCL Quick Reference GuideThis week there are 429 postings related to Fulton Schools degree programs in SDCL.

Follow the “Read more” link for just a few examples of what you can find in Sun Devil CareerLink this week.

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ASU students win first-place awards in geotechnical, construction engineering competition

Posted by on Apr 24, 2015 in Competitions, Students | 0 comments

A design created by ASU students was selected for the official t-shirt of the International Foundation Congress and Equipment Exposition.

A design created by ASU students was selected for the official t-shirt of the International Foundation Congress and Equipment Exposition.

A team of 17 civil engineering and construction engineering majors won top awards in the geotechnical engineering student competition at the International Foundation Congress and Equipment Exposition (IFCEE) in San Antonio, Texas.

The IFCEE is the world’s largest exhibition dedicated solely to the building foundation construction industry. It showcases technology related to design and construction of foundations and ground improvement systems for bridges, buildings, dams and other civil infrastructure.

The event was co-sponsored by the Geo-Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineering (ASCE), the Deep Foundation Institute, the Association of Drilled Shaft Contractors, and the Pile Driving Contractors Association.

Student competitions were held in five areas: geo-video production; T-shirt design; geo-prediction; mechanically stabilized earth wall construction and a geo-poster competition.

The Fulton Schools team was the only one to qualify for all five competitions and to receive awards in three of them.

The group representing the School for Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, one of ASU’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, consisted of 13 graduate students and four undergraduates.

A T-shirt design by graduate students Nariman Mahabadi and Xianglei Zeng was selected for the official conference t-shirt. It was printed and distributed to all students at the event.

ASU students Devinne Ramirez (left) and John Furniss built a small-scale mechanically stabilized earth wall for a student competition at a recent major industry conference. Ramirez is undergraduate construction engineering major. Furniss is a graduate student in geotechnical engineering.

ASU students Devinne Ramirez (left) and John Furniss built a small-scale mechanically stabilized earth wall for a student competition at the recent international industry conference. Ramirez is an undergraduate construction engineering major. Furniss is a graduate student in geotechnical engineering.

The best video production award went to graduate students Vel Palinivelu and Jesus Esquivel, and undergraduate Miriam Woolley, for a video to educate a K-12 audience on geotechnical factors affecting the strength of building foundations.

Watch the award-winning video.

Nasser Hamdan, a civil engineering doctoral student, won the Geo-poster competition for his research poster “Enzyme Induced Carbonate Precipitation for Fugitive Dust Control.”

Graduate student Evan Benson and undergraduate Jake Andersen made up ASU’s Geo-prediction team. They had to predict the capacity of two test piles from laboratory and field test results.

The test piles had been installed for a major construction project and load tested for quality-assurance purposes. For the competition, predictions of pile settlement under the design load and of the load at failure for each pile were compared to the measured values.

The ASU Geo-prediction team placed among the finalists.

The mechanically stabilized earth wall team consisted of graduate students Yutong Lu and John Furniss, and undergraduates Devinne Ramirez and Miriam Wooley. The team finished in the top 10 for their event.

Funding to send the students to the industry exposition was provided by the Ira A. Fulton endowment for the Chair for Geotechnical Engineering, the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, and the Ehret Student Team Competition Endowment.

ASU expects to organize a student team for similar competitions at the joint meeting of the American Society of Civil Engineers Geotechnical Institute and Structural Engineering Institute in February 2016 at the Phoenix Convention Center.

Jiaqi Wu contributed to this report

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